I have a Workers’ Compensation Hearing: What Should I do? What Should I Expect?

Please be advised that I am writing this article based upon my background and experience as an applicant s attorney who has attended a multitude of local Appeals Boards from San Francisco to San Diego.

Each local Appeals Board is unique. If you are represented by counsel, please contact them for advice. My comments are informational only and are not meant to provide legal advice.

First, there is the Department of Industrial Relations Website: http://www.dir.ca.gov/dwc/dwc_home_page.htm

This site contains valuable information that can allow you to find out whether your case is on the calendar, advise you of the address of your local WCAB, and provide you contact information if you are late or unable to make your appearance.

Also, there is a section concerning Disability Accommodation for hearings.

What should I expect?

Most hearings are held at local WCAB offices. Hearings for the most part are informal. At these hearing, disputes can be resolved, cases can be settled, cases can be tried, cases can be taken off the calendar for further handling, cases can be tried, and cases can be continued.

If you need some special accommodations as a result of a medical condition, industrial or not, you should contact the WCAB in advance. Please refer to the above-noted link to obtain further information concerning it.

Please be sure to be on time. If you are set for trial and show up late, the Judge could take another case ahead of yours. Further, failure to show up in certain circumstances can result in the dismissal of your case.

If you are running late, it is important notify the court.

What should I bring?

First, I recommend that you bring the letter or document that gave you notice to appear. This can help you in case there is a discrepancy.

Second, if you have been prescribed and expected to use a device or apparatus as part of your claim, I recommend you bring it. For example if you use a cane or wear a knee brace or wrist brace, I recommend you bring them.

Third, hearings can be lengthy. You should bring any medications you take on a regular basis in case you need them. Also, bringing a snack or something to eat would not be a bad idea.

Bringing some money is important, too. Some WCABs have paid parking lots. Parking expenses at the WCAB are not reimbursable.

Fourth, bringing a list of your medications and a list of doctors you have seen is something helpful.

Fifth, bring a cell phone as it can helpful if you need to communicate to your attorney or their office. If you go into a Court Hearing, please be sure to put it on silence or vibrate.

Finally, you need to bring something to kill some time. I recommend that you bring a book or an electronic device. Most boards also have WI-FI connections. You can ask the front desk about it.

What should I wear?

For the WCABs that I have attended, there has not been one that had required formal clothing for injured workers. Some Boards require attorneys to wear coats and ties.

I recommend casual clothing that is comfortable. It is important that you do not wear anything that could possibly raise questions. For example, don’t wear any clothing that could be deemed offensive or informative. For example a hat with a marijuana leaf on it, if you go to trial, could lead to questions about drug use.

Wearing a shirt from a new job could lead to questioning about new employment.

Generally, if you are a Police Officer, Deputy or Firefighter, and are on duty/workday, coming in uniform is proper.

What should I do first?

First, you should check in. There are sign-in sheets that are usually posted on a wall or are placed near the front desk on a clipboard.

If your name is there, you should circle your name and have a seat and wait for your attorney.

If you are not on the list, you should go to the front desk and make an inquiry. If you do not have an attorney, advise the front desk and they should direct you to the Information and Assistance Officer.

How long are the hearings? What happens?

For most hearings, you are to remain in the waiting room. You should be patient. Matters sometimes take a while to be resolved. There can be long lines to meet the Judge. There will be Defense Attorneys who have difficulty reaching their adjusters.  If you think there is a problem, do not hesitate to contact your attorney’s office to find out what is going on.

Hearings are scheduled for the morning, afternoon, or all day. Most morning hearings resolve before noon. Sometimes, matters can be held over to the afternoon.

Afternoon hearings usually end before 4:30pm and will definitely end when the offices are closed. Expedited Hearings can be in the morning or the afternoon.

Trials can last all day long.

At most conferences, the attorneys meet in the courtroom and discuss the matter. The parties usually try to resolve the issues. If they are not able to do so, they prepare paperwork to present to the WCAB to set the matter for a hearing. All hearings must be disposed by the Judge.

Many times, your case can be settled at the hearing and the Judge can approve your settlement. Generally, monies from the settlement will begin to be paid within 30 days from the hearing.

There are a number of types of hearings that can come before the WCAB. There are Trials, Lien Trials, Mandatory Settlement Conferences, Status Conferences, Lien Conferences, Expedited Hearing and AOE/COE Priority Conferences. For some of these hearings, your attendance is not required. Check with your attorney concerning the need for you to appear.

What is a Trial like?

Trials at the WCAB are informal. It is an administrative hearing and there is no jury. At a trial, there will be a Judge wearing a black robe a Court Reporter. The attorneys on your case will be present.

It is possible that an employer representative may be present as well. Sometimes, you will see insurance company witnesses in the waiting room.

During the trial you are allowed to be present. You may be called to testify. This includes being cross-examined by the defendant. The Judge may ask questions as well. Witnesses can be called and videotape may be shown.

Good luck!

Law Offices of Edward J. Singer

At the Law Offices of Edward J. Singer, A Professional Law Corporation, we represent our clients with their workers’ compensation claims.

With more than 23 years of expertise in defending workers’ rights, we are here to assist with any questions a person in California who receives workers’ compensation may have.

We welcome anyone who needs assistance to contact us today concerning any workers’ comp questions or issues.