FINGERTIP INJURIES AND WORKERS’ COMPENSATION: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Upper Extremity Injuries are very common in an occupational setting.  Upper Extremity Injuries can include injuries to the fingertip.  Fingertip injuries can involve an amputation.

In the general population, “[i]t is estimated that as many as 45,000 finger amputations are performed in the US per year with an incidence rate of 7.5/100,000 people.” Kawaiah A, Thakur M, Garg S, Kawasmi SH, Hassan A. Fingertip Injuries and Amputations: A Review of the Literature. Cureus. 2020;12(5):e8291. Published 2020 May 26. doi:10.7759/cureus.8291

This article will discuss Fingertip Injuries, causes of fingertip injuries, treatment for fingertip injuries, a special workers’ compensation law with respect to amputation cases, and issues relating permanent disability.

What is the Fingertip? Why is It Unique?

 Fingertips are unique. “The tip of the digit comprises virtually all tissue components present elsewhere in the body: skin, bone, joint, synovial membrane, ligaments, tendons, tendon sheaths, arteries, veins, lymphatic channels, nerves, and advanced nervous end organs.” Kawaiah A, Thakur M, Garg S, Kawasmi SH, Hassan A. Fingertip Injuries and Amputations: A Review of the Literature. Cureus. 2020;12(5):e8291. Published 2020 May 26. doi:10.7759/cureus.8291

Thus, a traumatized tip can experience a variety of symptoms.  These symptoms and factors of impairment can include tenderness, sensitivity to cold, discoloration, and deformity.   Kawaiah A, Thakur M, Garg S, Kawasmi SH, Hassan A. Fingertip Injuries and Amputations: A Review of the Literature. Cureus. 2020;12(5):e8291. Published 2020 May 26. doi:10.7759/cureus.8291

What Are Common Causes of Fingertip Injuries?

Many occupational hand injuries involve metal items.  The metal items can include hand tools which include blades.  On a personal note, I have had fingertip injuries occur on table saws in which safeties have been removed.  Also, I  have had fingertip injuries in which the hand accidentally went into a piece of moving machinery.

Fingertip injuries can also occur as a result of sharps.   Sharps are devices that are used to cut.  These include many items used in the medical field such as auto injectors, connection needles and sets, infusion sets, lancets, needles, and syringes.

Sharp injuries can result in lacerations, amputations, or neurovascular injuries. Kawaiah A, Thakur M, Garg S, Kawasmi SH, Hassan A. Fingertip Injuries and Amputations: A Review of the Literature. Cureus. 2020;12(5):e8291. Published 2020 May 26. doi:10.7759/cureus.8291

 What Are Goals of Treatment?

 Treatment goals for fingertip injuries include restoration of sensation of the tip, improving the durability of the tip, and providing for proper bone support to allow for nail growth. Kawaiah A, Thakur M, Garg S, Kawasmi SH, Hassan A. Fingertip Injuries and Amputations: A Review of the Literature. Cureus. 2020;12(5):e8291. Published 2020 May 26. doi:10.7759/cureus.8291

What Problems Can Arise from a Fingertip Injury?

Problems arising from fingertip injuries can include deformities, intolerance to cold, skin tenderness, stiffness, and long-term functional loss. Kawaiah A, Thakur M, Garg S, Kawasmi SH, Hassan A. Fingertip Injuries and Amputations: A Review of the Literature. Cureus. 2020;12(5):e8291. Published 2020 May 26. doi:10.7759/cureus.8291

How Is a Fingertip Injury Treated?

Due to the complexity and importance of the fingertip, there are many issues that can present.  There are concerns with respect to psychological factors that can present with such injuries.

Also, there may be issues of pain syndromes that can occur as a result of a fingertip injury.  These pain syndromes can even occur in the case of minor contusion. Approach to Fingertip Injuries Patricia Martin-Playa, MD, Anthony Foo, MD* Clin Plastic Surg 46 (2019) 275–283 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cps.2019.02.001

Treatment can include repairing the skin by stiches or glue, skin grafting, reconstruction, composite grafts, flap reconstruction, bone graft, nail complex reconstruction.

Are There Psycho-Social Factors Issues with Fingertip Injuries?

Yes.  Fingertips are an extremely important part of the body.  They are used frequently during the day for a variety of tasks. Fingertip injuries can impact one’s occupation and their participation in hobbies.  For example, a fingertip injury may impact on one’s ability to perform a musical instrument.

Fingertips are usually visible to the public.  Therefore, there can be an emotional impact on the patient.

Fingertip injuries that are part of a workers’ compensations have secondary motivation issues. For instance, the patient may have concerns about disability status and impairment.

Fingertip injuries can be subject to clinical bias. For example, medical practitioners may view the severity of the injury differently from the patient. Approach to Fingertip Injuries Patricia Martin-Playa, MD, Anthony Foo, MD* Clin Plastic Surg 46 (2019) 275–283 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cps.2019.02.001

Is There a Special Law for Amputation Cases?

Yes. In the case of amputations, total temporary disability benefits are extended out to 240 weeks from 104 weeks.  This is pursuant to Labor Code Section 4565(c)(3)(c.)

What Type of Permanent Impairment Can Arise from A Fingertip Injury?

Fingertip injuries can cause many types of impairments.  There are impairments that relate to amputations, there are impairments that relate to skin conditions, there are impairments that relate to nerve damage, there are impairments which relate to loss of function such as range of motion.  Also, there may be a pain impairment add-on.

What if I Need Advice?

If you would like a free consultation regarding workers’ compensation, please contact the Law Offices of Edward J. Singer, a Professional Law Corporation. We have been helping people in Central and Southern California deal with their workers’ compensation cases for 27 years. Contact us today for more information.

 

 

 

 

UPPER EXTREMITY WORKERS’ COMPENSATION SURGERIES: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Studies about workers’ compensation as always of interest to Injured Workers.   A lot of these studies tell us how and why insurance companies, employers and doctors act in particular ways.   A study addressing upper extremity surgeries provides us such insight. The study compared the results of industrial versus non-industrial upper extremity surgeries.

This article will discuss, upper extremity surgeries, issues relating to upper extremity surgeries, and the results of the study.

What Are Upper Extremity Surgeries?

 With respect to upper extremities, there are a variety of surgeries that are done on an industrial basis.  Upper extremity surgeries can range from shoulders to finger tips. Parts operated on can include areas such as the shoulders, biceps, elbows, forearms, wrists, and fingers.

For shoulders and elbows, there operations can include fracture surgeries, total shoulder replacements, shoulder arthroscopies, rotator cuff repairs, tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow, and elbow arthroscopy.

For the wrist, operations can include fracture surgeries, carpal tunnel releases, wrist arthroscopies, wrist joint replacements and wrist fusions.

How Are Workers’ Compensation Upper Extremity Surgeries Different Than Non-Industrial Upper Extremity Surgeries?

Approval:  Unlike Health Insurance Company approval for surgeries, Workers’ Compensation surgeries are subject to utilization review and independent medical review. Thus, there are guidelines and algorithms that must be met in order for surgeries to get authorized.  This can lead to delays in getting approval.

Medical Providers:  For many Injured Workers, they are constrained to using hand surgeons and upper extremity surgeons within the workers’ compensation insurance medical provider networks. Thus, the quality of the surgeon is subject to the insurance company’s dedication to having good providers.

Total Temporary Disability Benefits: For Injured Workers, they receive benefits is they remain symptomatic. Therefore, it is necessary that the voice all of their problems.

Permanent Disability Benefits: For Injured Workers, they need to be critical of the results of the surgery and be able to describe them.  Therefore, the result is viewed with this mindset.

What Was the Study’s Conclusion?

 The study “found that patients receiving WC[workers’ compensation] had worse postsurgical results after upper extremity surgery and demonstrated less pre- vs postoperative improvement than uncompensated patients regardless of which outcomes were measured. However, this effect was not uniform among different types of outcomes. Functional measures, such as AOM or grip strength, were least likely to demonstrate a significant difference between compensated and uncompensated patients. The same was true in studies that measured pre- vs postoperative improvement rather than only assess patient postoperatively.” Fujihara Y, Shauver MJ, Lark ME, Zhong L, Chung KC. The Effect of Workers’ Compensation on Outcome Measurement Methods after Upper Extremity Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2017;139(4):923-933. doi:10.1097/PRS.0000000000003154. It was noted that this analysis was aware that compensated patients can result in artificial reduction of the therapeutic effect which may lead to incorrect conclusions. Supra.

The study noted that “.. the effect of WC on surgical outcome is not solely an issue of malingering Americans. Compensation systems that do not incentivise feigning impairment, also observe worse outcomes associated with WC. Rather, this may indicate that increased impairment among workers receiving WC may be a result of psychological effects on patients caused by a sense of victimization or injustice .” Fujihara Y, Shauver MJ, Lark ME, Zhong L, Chung KC. The Effect of Workers’ Compensation on Outcome Measurement Methods after Upper Extremity Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2017;139(4):923-933. doi:10.1097/PRS.0000000000003154

In sum, it would appear that Injured Workers have poorer post-operative results.   There are factors of income, malingering, psychological effects of victimhood and injustice may be the factors lead to a poorer workers’ compensation result.

Knowing these Results, How Will an Injured Worker Be Treated?

 Insurance Companies, knowing the surgery result may be poor, may want to avoid providing for it.  This can be done in two ways: one, settling the case before surgery, two, contesting the need for the surgery.

Doctors take pride in their work.  Doctors like to have good results.  Therefore, doctors may not thrilled with Injured Workers because there will be some level of dissatisfaction and representations that the surgical result was not optimal.

Employers, like Insurance Companies, may not be happy with surgeries with poor results.  For them, they are faced with a costlier claim as well as possible issues with respect to return to work.   Return to work issues would involve either qualified Injured worker status or the need to provide alternative or modified work.

What if I Need Advice?

If you would like a free consultation regarding workers’ compensation, please contact the Law Offices of Edward J. Singer, a Professional Law Corporation. We have been helping people in Central and Southern California deal with their workers’ compensation cases for 27 years. Contact us today for more information.

 

EVEN TREATERS GET INJURED AT WORK: OCCUPATIONAL AND PHYSICAL THERAPISTS SUSTAINING INDUSTRIAL INJURIES:  MEDICAL PROVIDERS AND WORKERS’ COMPENSATION: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Occupational and Physical Therapists play a large role in helping Injured Workers recover from their industrial injuries.  In doing so, however, Occupational and Physical Therapists may be placing themselves at risk for sustaining a work injury. More specifically, both Occupational and Physical Therapist’s work activities can place them at risk for sustaining musculoskeletal disorders. These musculoskeletal disorders can include back problems, shoulder problems, and wrist problems.

The article will discuss Occupational and Physical Therapists, what activities they perform on the job that may be injurious to them, and the rates of injuries that occur for Occupational and Physical Therapists.

What is an Occupational Therapist (OT)?

Per the American Occupational Therapy Association, “occupational therapists …help people… participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities (occupations.)”

OT Programs can include “an individualized evaluation, during which the client/family and occupational therapist determine the person’s goals, [a] customized intervention to improve the person’s ability to perform daily activities and reach the goals, and an outcomes evaluation to ensure that the goals are being met and/or make changes to the intervention plan.”

What is a Physical Therapist (PT)?

Per the American Physical Therapy Association, “[p]hysical therapists are movement experts who improve quality of life through prescribed exercise, hands-on care, and patient education.”

“Physical therapists examine each person and then develops a treatment plan to improve their ability to move, reduce or manage pain, restore function, and prevent disability.”

What is the Difference Between an Occupational and Physical Therapists?

The Occupational Therapist focuses on the patient’s ability to perform work-related functions.  The Physical Therapist focuses on physical activities in general.

What Are The Work Activities That Are Injurious to OTs and PTs?

Transfers/Lifts and manual therapy have been found to be associated with musculoskeletal disorders. “Darragh AR, Campo M, King P. Work-related activities associated with injury in occupational and physical therapists. Work. 2012;42(3):373-84. doi: 10.3233/WOR-2012-1430. PMID: 22523031; PMCID: PMC3839086.  These activities have been found to impact the lumbar spine.  Supra.

Patient handling activities include (transfers, repositioning and patient lifting. Supra.

Manual therapy includes soft tissue work, joint mobilization, and orthopedic techniques. Supra.

Manual Therapy was found also found as a risk factor consistent risk factor for both injuries as well as gradual onset of WSMDs. Supra.  In workers’ compensation terms, this would be considered as a cumulative trauma injury.

With Respect to Musculoskeletal Disorders? Is There Any Difference Between OTs and PTs?

No. “Occupational (OTs) and physical therapists (PTs) have substantial and similar rates of work-related injury (WRI), musculoskeletal pain and musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD)” Darragh AR, Campo M, King P. Work-related activities associated with injury in occupational and physical therapists. Work. 2012;42(3):373-84. doi: 10.3233/WOR-2012-1430. PMID: 22523031; PMCID: PMC3839086.

“Darragh et al. reported an annual WRI incidence rate among OTs and PTs of 16.5 and 16.9 per 100 full-time workers, respectively.” Darragh AR, Campo M, King P. Work-related activities associated with injury in occupational and physical therapists. Work. 2012;42(3):373-84. doi: 10.3233/WOR-2012-1430. PMID: 22523031; PMCID: PMC3839086.

What Are Injury Rates for Activities?  What Do Therapists Think Are the Causes of Their Injuries?

“Manual therapy and transfers/lifts accounted for more than half of all injuries (54.0%), across all practice areas.” Supra.  “Manual therapy was the greatest proportion of injuries to the wrist and hand (69.1%).” Supra.  “Transfer and lifting activities were associated with 26.6% of injuries Over half of these injuries were to the low back (53.0%), followed by the shoulder (19.7%) and the head/neck (18.2%).” Supra.   “Other activities associated with injury included environmental and equipment interactions (10.9%), multiple activities (6.5%) and patient falls (5.7%)”

What Do Therapists Think of How They Get Hurt?

Therapists opine that force, awkward posture, repetitive motion, sustained posture, and fatigue were factors contributing to those type of injuries.  Supra.

For wrist and hand injuries, therapists opine that repetitive motion (experienced during joint mobilizations and range of motion activities), force (experienced during range of motion, soft tissue work, and joint mobilizations), awkward posture and sustained posture were factors contributing to those type of injuries. Supra.

For transfer and lifting activities, opined that “these injuries occurred both gradually because of repeated performance of transfers over time and more suddenly when a patient behaved in an unexpected way (grabbed the therapist, stumbled, or moved in an unexpected direction.) The majority of therapist identified force (72.7%;48/66), including overexertion and lifting, and awkward posture (54.5%; 36/66) as the primary contributing factors to their transfer injuries.” Supra.

What if I Need Advice?

If you would like a free consultation regarding workers’ compensation, please contact the Law Offices of Edward J. Singer, a Professional Law Corporation. We have been helping people in Central and Southern California deal with their workers’ compensation cases for 27 years. Contact us today for more information.

AGE, PHYSICAL DEMANDING JOBS AND MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS: OLDER WORKERS AT RISK FOR WORK INJURIES AND WORKERS’ COMPENSATION: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

The Labor Market in the United States is aging. As a result, Older Workers are performing a large variety of task within the Open Labor Market. Older Workers performing more tasks that make them at risk for work injuries. This is the case with respect to musculoskeletal injuries. Musculoskeletal injuries are commonly known as orthopedics injuries which include medical conditions with respect to the spine, the upper and the lower extremities. A study was done with respect and there were some findings made.

This article will discuss Older Workers, injury rates for Older Workers, and laws which impact Older Workers’ Workers’ Compensation Claims.

Does Age Matter When Looking at the Risk of Work Injuries?

Age alone is not the issue. The type of labor is what is of import. In the labor market, there are jobs with minimal physical demands. There are other jobs which involve greater physical demands. Thus, some Older Workers perform light duty jobs such as receptionists or greeters. Other Older Workers perform more arduous jobs such as warehouse worker or construction worker.

The study, of interest, focused on jobs with physical demands.

Old Age combined with greater physical demands were relevant with respect to work injuries. See P. M. Smith, J. Berecki-Gisolf, Age, occupational demands and the risk of serious work injury, Occupational Medicine, Volume 64, Issue 8, December 2014, Pages 571–576, https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqu125

It was found when the occupational [physical] demands were greater there was an increase of risk of injury. Further, “[t]he relationship between age and claim-risk was strongest when occupational demands were highest.” P. M. Smith, J. Berecki-Gisolf, Age, occupational demands and the risk of serious work injury, Occupational Medicine, Volume 64, Issue 8, December 2014, Pages 571–576, https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqu125

Is the Increase Risk Associated only with Musculoskeletal Injuries?

It was found that “Older age was associated with a higher risk of work injury claims for both musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions,” P. M. Smith, J. Berecki-Gisolf, Age, occupational demands and the risk of serious work injury, Occupational Medicine, Volume 64, Issue 8, December 2014, Pages 571–576, https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqu125

Is there a Difference Between Musculoskeletal vs. Non-Musculoskeletal Disorders?

Yes. “with a slightly stronger relationship observed for occupational physical demands and risk of musculoskeletal, compared with non-musculoskeletal, conditions.” P. M. Smith, J. Berecki-Gisolf, Age, occupational demands and the risk of serious work injury, Occupational Medicine, Volume 64, Issue 8, December 2014, Pages 571–576, https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqu125

Are There any Laws or Rules in Workers’ Compensation that Assist Older Workers?

Yes. Age is factored as part of the Permanent Disability Rating Formula.
Per the Schedule for Rating Permanent Disabilities, California Workers’ Compensation Law provides for an age adjustment which provides for an increase in permanent disability for ages 42 and older. It also scales up with age and tops out at age 62. The age used in this assessment is the age on the date of injury. There is a table upon which you obtain the figures. It is on Pages 6-1-6-5. See SCHEDULE FOR RATING PERMANENT DISABILITIES UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE LABOR CODE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA (2005)

Are There Any Rules that Do Not Assist Injured Workers?

Yes. There is a legal issue of apportionment. Apportionment is a tool allowed to reduce an Injured Workers’ Award.

Labor Code Section 4663, provides that “[a] physician shall make an apportionment determination by finding what approximate percentage of the permanent disability was caused by the direct result of injury arising out of and occurring in the course of employment and what approximate percentage of the permanent disability was caused by other factors both before and subsequent to the industrial injury, including prior industrial injuries. See Escobedo v. Marshalls, CNA Ins. Co., 70 Cal. Comp. Cases 604, 2005 Cal. Wrk. Comp. LEXIS 71 (W.C.A.B. April 19, 2005). In Escobedo, the board indicated that apportionment of permanent disability can be made based on the preexisting arthritis in applicant’s knees was found acceptable. Note: Older Employees are more likely to have pre-existing arthritic processes which could allow for apportionment to be found.

What if I Need Advice?

If you would like a free consultation regarding workers’ compensation, please contact the Law Offices of Edward J. Singer, a Professional Law Corporation. We have been helping people in Central and Southern California deal with their workers’ compensation cases for 27 years. Contact us today for more information.

CAR WASH WORKERS AND WORKERS’ COMPENSATION: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Car Wash Workers have many unique issues with respect to workers’ compensation. Car Wash Workers perform varied tasks which place them at risk for injury. Car Wash Workers are exposed to chemicals and liquids which may place them at risk for injury.

This article will discuss Car Wash Workers and the job tasks that place them at risk for industrial injury.

What Makes Car Wash Workers at Risk for Injury?

“The car wash industry, however, has salient features that predispose to important occupational health risks, namely, the use of hazardous chemicals (ie, hydrofluoric acid), the requirement of repetitive use of extremities, [and] close contact with moving machinery,” Occupational Health of New York City Car Wash Workers Dickens, Brittany BA; Ruiz-Olivo, Laura BA; Palaguachi, Diego BA; Jimenez, David BA; Markowitz, Steven B. MD, DrPH Author Information Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: February 2019 – Volume 61 – Issue 2 – p e77-e79 doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001520

What are the Common Job Tasks Do Workers Perform at Car Washes?

In the study, most participants rotated among the few major tasks at the car wash, including drying cars (63%), brushing and soaping cars (56%), and vacuuming and cleaning cars (50%).
Occupational Health of New York City Car Wash Workers Dickens, Brittany BA; Ruiz-Olivo, Laura BA; Palaguachi, Diego BA; Jimenez, David BA; Markowitz, Steven B. MD, DrPH Author Information Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: February 2019 – Volume 61 – Issue 2 – p e77-e79 doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001520

What Type of Complaints Can Car Wash Workers Have?

In the study, “Car wash workers reported a high prevalence of health symptoms during the 12 months prior to the survey, including at least one site of musculoskeletal pain (80%); upper airway, eye, or skin irritation (71%); and at least one lower respiratory symptom (47%) (Table 2). Approximately one-half of all workers reported eye and throat irritation, back pain, neck or shoulder pain, hand pain, headaches, or nausea/stomach discomfort. The majority of workers reported multiple symptoms across the different symptoms groups. Thirty-eight (54%) participants reported two or more musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, and 37 (53%) reported two or more types of irritation (nose bleeds, throat irritation, eye irritation/burning, skin rash, or skin burn). Two workers had suffered fractures at work in the past 12 months, and one-quarter of the work force reported a laceration or abrasion of the skin. Three workers reported an episode of asthma or an asthma attack in the past 12 months.” Occupational Health of New York City Car Wash Workers Dickens, Brittany BA; Ruiz-Olivo, Laura BA; Palaguachi, Diego BA; Jimenez, David BA; Markowitz, Steven B. MD, Dr PH Author Information Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine: February 2019 – Volume 61 – Issue 2 – p e77-e79 doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001520

What Type of Hand Movements Can Be a Source of Injury?

There are numerous tasks at Car Washes that can be a source of injury. These tasks involve Manual Handling, Awkward Hand Positions, Applying Pressure, and the use of Vibrating Tools.

Manual Handling includes “lifting, pulling, pushing, carrying and holding. Tasks that require these actions can include moving and transporting heavy equipment; everyday machines, such as vacuums; and loads, such as laundry.”

Awkward Hand Position includes “contorting hand posture to abnormal positions to clean hard-to-reach areas or slanted surfaces, such as windows. This would also include risks associated with using older or cheap spray bottles or equipment handles.”

Applying Pressure includes “pressing down or applying extra pressure to remove dirt or soil. Consider more powerful cleaning products or equipment if workers are using too much elbow grease to get the job done.”

The Use of Vibrating Equipment which includes “losing control and constant shaking. Machines that vibrate too much can cause hand fatigue, increasing the chances of workers losing control of the equipment.” . The importance of hand care in the car care industry Rich DiPaolo (2016)

Are There Chemical Exposures That Are Injurious to Car Wash Workers?

Yes. Chemicals used at Car Washes have been implicated in causing occupational illness.

“Exposure to hydrofluoric acid (HF) causes corrosive chemical burns and potentially fatal systemic toxicity. Car and truck wash cleaning products, rust removers, and aluminum brighteners often contain HF because it is efficient in breaking down roadway matter.” Reeb-Whitaker CK, Eckert CM, Anderson NJ, Bonauto DK. Occupational Hydrofluoric Acid Injury from Car and Truck Washing–Washington State, 2001-2013. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015;64(32):874-877. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6432a4

“Occupational exposure to HF-based wash solutions can result in chemical burns, disability, and death. HF’s potential to cause severe injury.” Supra.

Are Car Wash Employees At Risk for Skin Disorders?

Yes. Cash Wash Employees suffer skin-related due to working with liquids. This type of work is called “wet work.” Zani MLC, Lazzarini R, Silva-Junior JS. W arm-water immersion foot among car wash workers. Rev Bras Med Trab. 2017;15(3):217-221. Published 2017 Sep 1. doi:10.5327/Z1679443520170021

“Wet work is characterized by activities involving frequent immersion of the hands in water, frequent or intensive hand washing or frequent use of impermeable gloves. Workers exposed to wet work might develop hand eczema and contact dermatitis”

Car Washes provide for the risk of both hand skin disorders as well as foot skin disorders. Supra.

“Prolonged contact with water causes different forms of dermatitis, including hand eczema among workers exposed to wet work3. In turn, superficial mycoses are the conditions that most commonly affect the lower limbs. However, continuous and excessive contact with water might also cause a disorder known as immersion foot or trench foot. The latter is a dermatosis that results from prolonged exposure to physical agents such as dampness and cold, and was first described among soldiers in World War I (1914-1918). ”
Supra.

What if I Need Advice?

If you would like a free consultation regarding workers’ compensation, please contact the Law Offices of Edward J. Singer, a Professional Law Corporation. We have been helping people in Central and Southern California deal with their workers’ compensation cases for 27 years. Contact us today for more information.

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